ADHD

What is ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, but originally known as attention deficit disorder, or ADD) is a brain/behavioral disorder that affects about 10% of school-age children. Boys are two to three times more likely than girls to be diagnosed with it, although it’s not understood why.

Symptoms, which include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity, can make it hard for a child with ADHD to succeed in school, finish tasks at home, or get along with other children or adults. While it is normal for all children to be inattentive, hyperactive, or impulsive at times, for children with ADHD, these behaviors are more severe and occur more often.

ADHD can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Although there is currently no cure for ADHD, treatments to relieve the symptoms can help those with ADHD succeed in school and lead productive lives.

Brain imaging studies have revealed that, in children with ADHD, the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed, on average, by about three years, with the delay most pronounced in the brain regions involved in thinking, paying attention, and planning.

(Source for statistics: Centers for Disease Control 2015 study).

ADHD Resources

The Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA, www.add.org) is the world’s leading adult ADHD organization. Its mission is to provide information, resources and networking opportunities to help adults with AD/HD lead better lives.

Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD, http://www.chadd.org/Understanding-ADHD.aspx) is the nation’s leading non-profit organization serving individuals with ADHD and their families. CHADD’s 200 local chapters throughout the U.S. offer support for individuals, parents, teachers, and professionals. CHADD is a membership organization, produces the bi-monthly Attention! magazine (for members), and sponsors an annual conference.

The federally funded National Resource Center on ADHD (NRC, http://help4adhd.org/ ) website offers the services of trained specialists to answer your questions by phone (800-233-4050) or online about all aspects of ADHD. The NRC provides evidence-based information about symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, educational rights, workplace challenges, parenting, legal issues and social skills.

The ADHD Coaches Organization (ACO, http://adhdcoaches.org/) is the professional membership organization for ADHD coaches, a non-profit association created to advance the profession of ADHD coaching worldwide. The ACO supports the value of coach-specific training, as well as education in the field of ADHD and ADHD coaching.

The Morris Center (www.themorriscenter.com) is an all-inclusive neurodevelopmental treatment center, focused on improving the skills of those affected by ADHD or dyslexia. The Morris Center uses a transdisciplinary team of caring professionals, individually tailored assessments of treatments, and a scientifically proven treatment program, which makes long-term improvements of weak skills that may cause academic or work difficulties. (themorriscenter.com)

The Neuro-development of Words, or NOW!, (www.nowprograms.com) Company provides research-based programs to prevent or improve learning difficulties and enrich language skills for children and adults. Their programs are designed for easy implementation in classrooms, small groups, or one-on-one settings. Their programs have also helped private medical clinics that specialize in improving reading, spelling, writing, comprehension, memory, reason/problem-solving, language, and speech difficulties.